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In the last post I mentioned the sons of Lone Horn (or One Horn). I’ll start with one of my favorite names of all times…
Touch the Clouds
I’ve seen his name written as Touch the Clouds, Raising Clouds, Touch the Cloud, and various other names that essentially pair great heights and clouds. I think its a really gorgeous name.
Information on Touch the Clouds is a bit spotty; there is a period of time where he may or may not have been in a battle, and judging by what I’ve read about his history, that timeline can cause great strife amongst historians/ fans of Touch The Clouds, so I thought that I (being a lover of history, but by no means a historian), would skip that debate altogether and instead give you a few breadcrumbs to follow on your own.
Ordinarily, I loathe when people site wikipedia as the ultimate source for their information, but given the little bit you can easily find about Touch The Clouds online, I think the wiki page has done a pretty decent job of briefly summarizing the readily available information on his life—
Here is the introduction thru the section about his rise in prominence, and below you will find the link to read the entire page:
Touch the Clouds (Lakota: Maȟpíya Ičáȟtagya or Maȟpíya Íyapat’o) (c. 1838 – September 5, 1905) was a chief of the Minneconjou Teton Lakota (also known as Sioux) known for his bravery and skill in battle, physical strength and for his diplomacy in counsel. The youngest son of Lone Horn, he was brother to Spotted Elk, Frog, and Roman Nose. There is evidence suggesting that he was a cousin to Crazy Horse.
When Touch the Clouds’s Wakpokinyan band split in the mid 1870s, the band traveled to the Cheyenne River Agency. He assumed the leadership of the band in 1875 after the death of his father, and retained leadership during the initial period of the Great Sioux War of 1876-77. After the Battle of the Little Bighorn, he took the band north, eventually surrendering at the Spotted Tail Agency, where he enlisted in the Indian Scouts. However, not long after being present at the death of Crazy Horse, Touch the Clouds transferred with his band back to the Cheyenne River Agency.
Touch the Clouds became one of the new leaders of the Minneconjou at the Cheyenne River Agency in 1881, keeping his position until his death on September 5, 1905. Upon his death his son, Amos Charging First, took over as the new chief.
Born between 1837 and 1839, Touch the Clouds was the youngest son of the influential headman Lone Horn, leader of a Minneconjou band called the Wakpokinyan (Flies Along the Stream). Touch the Clouds was known for his height and great strength, to which his name relates. Lieutenant Henry R. Lemly, who met Touch the Clouds in 1877, described him as a Minneconjou “of magnificent physique, standing six feet five inches in his moccasins, and without an ounce of surplus flesh, weighing 280 pounds”.

By the time that Touch the Clouds had reached his thirties, he had earned the respect of his peers and had been selected as the head of one of the tribe’s warrior societies In this role, he often led war parties against enemy tribes. White Bull later recalled an occasion in 1872 when Touch the Clouds led a horse-raiding party but decided to turn back upon discovering that they were greatly outnumbered by the Crow.

The crisis over the increasing European-American presence on the northern Great Plains caused growing dissension among the various Lakota bands as they debated what to do. The Wakpokinyan appear to have split, with part of the band (including Touch the Clouds) going in to the Cheyenne River Agency on the Missouri River. A portion led by Lame Deer chose to remain out. Lone Horn struggled to maintain dialogue between the various factions of Minneconjou and their relatives, part of his long record as a Lakota diplomat.After Lone Horn died in 1875, the mantle of leadership fell to his son,just as the US Army was beginning its campaign against the non-treaty Cheyenne and Lakota bands.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Touch_the_Clouds

Here is another link with quotes, family history and a bit more information about Touch The Clouds. The pictures posted above are from this source:
http://www.american-tribes.com/Lakota/BIO/TouchClouds.htm
Zoom Info
In the last post I mentioned the sons of Lone Horn (or One Horn). I’ll start with one of my favorite names of all times…
Touch the Clouds
I’ve seen his name written as Touch the Clouds, Raising Clouds, Touch the Cloud, and various other names that essentially pair great heights and clouds. I think its a really gorgeous name.
Information on Touch the Clouds is a bit spotty; there is a period of time where he may or may not have been in a battle, and judging by what I’ve read about his history, that timeline can cause great strife amongst historians/ fans of Touch The Clouds, so I thought that I (being a lover of history, but by no means a historian), would skip that debate altogether and instead give you a few breadcrumbs to follow on your own.
Ordinarily, I loathe when people site wikipedia as the ultimate source for their information, but given the little bit you can easily find about Touch The Clouds online, I think the wiki page has done a pretty decent job of briefly summarizing the readily available information on his life—
Here is the introduction thru the section about his rise in prominence, and below you will find the link to read the entire page:
Touch the Clouds (Lakota: Maȟpíya Ičáȟtagya or Maȟpíya Íyapat’o) (c. 1838 – September 5, 1905) was a chief of the Minneconjou Teton Lakota (also known as Sioux) known for his bravery and skill in battle, physical strength and for his diplomacy in counsel. The youngest son of Lone Horn, he was brother to Spotted Elk, Frog, and Roman Nose. There is evidence suggesting that he was a cousin to Crazy Horse.
When Touch the Clouds’s Wakpokinyan band split in the mid 1870s, the band traveled to the Cheyenne River Agency. He assumed the leadership of the band in 1875 after the death of his father, and retained leadership during the initial period of the Great Sioux War of 1876-77. After the Battle of the Little Bighorn, he took the band north, eventually surrendering at the Spotted Tail Agency, where he enlisted in the Indian Scouts. However, not long after being present at the death of Crazy Horse, Touch the Clouds transferred with his band back to the Cheyenne River Agency.
Touch the Clouds became one of the new leaders of the Minneconjou at the Cheyenne River Agency in 1881, keeping his position until his death on September 5, 1905. Upon his death his son, Amos Charging First, took over as the new chief.
Born between 1837 and 1839, Touch the Clouds was the youngest son of the influential headman Lone Horn, leader of a Minneconjou band called the Wakpokinyan (Flies Along the Stream). Touch the Clouds was known for his height and great strength, to which his name relates. Lieutenant Henry R. Lemly, who met Touch the Clouds in 1877, described him as a Minneconjou “of magnificent physique, standing six feet five inches in his moccasins, and without an ounce of surplus flesh, weighing 280 pounds”.

By the time that Touch the Clouds had reached his thirties, he had earned the respect of his peers and had been selected as the head of one of the tribe’s warrior societies In this role, he often led war parties against enemy tribes. White Bull later recalled an occasion in 1872 when Touch the Clouds led a horse-raiding party but decided to turn back upon discovering that they were greatly outnumbered by the Crow.

The crisis over the increasing European-American presence on the northern Great Plains caused growing dissension among the various Lakota bands as they debated what to do. The Wakpokinyan appear to have split, with part of the band (including Touch the Clouds) going in to the Cheyenne River Agency on the Missouri River. A portion led by Lame Deer chose to remain out. Lone Horn struggled to maintain dialogue between the various factions of Minneconjou and their relatives, part of his long record as a Lakota diplomat.After Lone Horn died in 1875, the mantle of leadership fell to his son,just as the US Army was beginning its campaign against the non-treaty Cheyenne and Lakota bands.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Touch_the_Clouds

Here is another link with quotes, family history and a bit more information about Touch The Clouds. The pictures posted above are from this source:
http://www.american-tribes.com/Lakota/BIO/TouchClouds.htm
Zoom Info
In the last post I mentioned the sons of Lone Horn (or One Horn). I’ll start with one of my favorite names of all times…
Touch the Clouds
I’ve seen his name written as Touch the Clouds, Raising Clouds, Touch the Cloud, and various other names that essentially pair great heights and clouds. I think its a really gorgeous name.
Information on Touch the Clouds is a bit spotty; there is a period of time where he may or may not have been in a battle, and judging by what I’ve read about his history, that timeline can cause great strife amongst historians/ fans of Touch The Clouds, so I thought that I (being a lover of history, but by no means a historian), would skip that debate altogether and instead give you a few breadcrumbs to follow on your own.
Ordinarily, I loathe when people site wikipedia as the ultimate source for their information, but given the little bit you can easily find about Touch The Clouds online, I think the wiki page has done a pretty decent job of briefly summarizing the readily available information on his life—
Here is the introduction thru the section about his rise in prominence, and below you will find the link to read the entire page:
Touch the Clouds (Lakota: Maȟpíya Ičáȟtagya or Maȟpíya Íyapat’o) (c. 1838 – September 5, 1905) was a chief of the Minneconjou Teton Lakota (also known as Sioux) known for his bravery and skill in battle, physical strength and for his diplomacy in counsel. The youngest son of Lone Horn, he was brother to Spotted Elk, Frog, and Roman Nose. There is evidence suggesting that he was a cousin to Crazy Horse.
When Touch the Clouds’s Wakpokinyan band split in the mid 1870s, the band traveled to the Cheyenne River Agency. He assumed the leadership of the band in 1875 after the death of his father, and retained leadership during the initial period of the Great Sioux War of 1876-77. After the Battle of the Little Bighorn, he took the band north, eventually surrendering at the Spotted Tail Agency, where he enlisted in the Indian Scouts. However, not long after being present at the death of Crazy Horse, Touch the Clouds transferred with his band back to the Cheyenne River Agency.
Touch the Clouds became one of the new leaders of the Minneconjou at the Cheyenne River Agency in 1881, keeping his position until his death on September 5, 1905. Upon his death his son, Amos Charging First, took over as the new chief.
Born between 1837 and 1839, Touch the Clouds was the youngest son of the influential headman Lone Horn, leader of a Minneconjou band called the Wakpokinyan (Flies Along the Stream). Touch the Clouds was known for his height and great strength, to which his name relates. Lieutenant Henry R. Lemly, who met Touch the Clouds in 1877, described him as a Minneconjou “of magnificent physique, standing six feet five inches in his moccasins, and without an ounce of surplus flesh, weighing 280 pounds”.

By the time that Touch the Clouds had reached his thirties, he had earned the respect of his peers and had been selected as the head of one of the tribe’s warrior societies In this role, he often led war parties against enemy tribes. White Bull later recalled an occasion in 1872 when Touch the Clouds led a horse-raiding party but decided to turn back upon discovering that they were greatly outnumbered by the Crow.

The crisis over the increasing European-American presence on the northern Great Plains caused growing dissension among the various Lakota bands as they debated what to do. The Wakpokinyan appear to have split, with part of the band (including Touch the Clouds) going in to the Cheyenne River Agency on the Missouri River. A portion led by Lame Deer chose to remain out. Lone Horn struggled to maintain dialogue between the various factions of Minneconjou and their relatives, part of his long record as a Lakota diplomat.After Lone Horn died in 1875, the mantle of leadership fell to his son,just as the US Army was beginning its campaign against the non-treaty Cheyenne and Lakota bands.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Touch_the_Clouds

Here is another link with quotes, family history and a bit more information about Touch The Clouds. The pictures posted above are from this source:
http://www.american-tribes.com/Lakota/BIO/TouchClouds.htm
Zoom Info
In the last post I mentioned the sons of Lone Horn (or One Horn). I’ll start with one of my favorite names of all times…
Touch the Clouds
I’ve seen his name written as Touch the Clouds, Raising Clouds, Touch the Cloud, and various other names that essentially pair great heights and clouds. I think its a really gorgeous name.
Information on Touch the Clouds is a bit spotty; there is a period of time where he may or may not have been in a battle, and judging by what I’ve read about his history, that timeline can cause great strife amongst historians/ fans of Touch The Clouds, so I thought that I (being a lover of history, but by no means a historian), would skip that debate altogether and instead give you a few breadcrumbs to follow on your own.
Ordinarily, I loathe when people site wikipedia as the ultimate source for their information, but given the little bit you can easily find about Touch The Clouds online, I think the wiki page has done a pretty decent job of briefly summarizing the readily available information on his life—
Here is the introduction thru the section about his rise in prominence, and below you will find the link to read the entire page:
Touch the Clouds (Lakota: Maȟpíya Ičáȟtagya or Maȟpíya Íyapat’o) (c. 1838 – September 5, 1905) was a chief of the Minneconjou Teton Lakota (also known as Sioux) known for his bravery and skill in battle, physical strength and for his diplomacy in counsel. The youngest son of Lone Horn, he was brother to Spotted Elk, Frog, and Roman Nose. There is evidence suggesting that he was a cousin to Crazy Horse.
When Touch the Clouds’s Wakpokinyan band split in the mid 1870s, the band traveled to the Cheyenne River Agency. He assumed the leadership of the band in 1875 after the death of his father, and retained leadership during the initial period of the Great Sioux War of 1876-77. After the Battle of the Little Bighorn, he took the band north, eventually surrendering at the Spotted Tail Agency, where he enlisted in the Indian Scouts. However, not long after being present at the death of Crazy Horse, Touch the Clouds transferred with his band back to the Cheyenne River Agency.
Touch the Clouds became one of the new leaders of the Minneconjou at the Cheyenne River Agency in 1881, keeping his position until his death on September 5, 1905. Upon his death his son, Amos Charging First, took over as the new chief.
Born between 1837 and 1839, Touch the Clouds was the youngest son of the influential headman Lone Horn, leader of a Minneconjou band called the Wakpokinyan (Flies Along the Stream). Touch the Clouds was known for his height and great strength, to which his name relates. Lieutenant Henry R. Lemly, who met Touch the Clouds in 1877, described him as a Minneconjou “of magnificent physique, standing six feet five inches in his moccasins, and without an ounce of surplus flesh, weighing 280 pounds”.

By the time that Touch the Clouds had reached his thirties, he had earned the respect of his peers and had been selected as the head of one of the tribe’s warrior societies In this role, he often led war parties against enemy tribes. White Bull later recalled an occasion in 1872 when Touch the Clouds led a horse-raiding party but decided to turn back upon discovering that they were greatly outnumbered by the Crow.

The crisis over the increasing European-American presence on the northern Great Plains caused growing dissension among the various Lakota bands as they debated what to do. The Wakpokinyan appear to have split, with part of the band (including Touch the Clouds) going in to the Cheyenne River Agency on the Missouri River. A portion led by Lame Deer chose to remain out. Lone Horn struggled to maintain dialogue between the various factions of Minneconjou and their relatives, part of his long record as a Lakota diplomat.After Lone Horn died in 1875, the mantle of leadership fell to his son,just as the US Army was beginning its campaign against the non-treaty Cheyenne and Lakota bands.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Touch_the_Clouds

Here is another link with quotes, family history and a bit more information about Touch The Clouds. The pictures posted above are from this source:
http://www.american-tribes.com/Lakota/BIO/TouchClouds.htm
Zoom Info

In the last post I mentioned the sons of Lone Horn (or One Horn). I’ll start with one of my favorite names of all times…

Touch the Clouds

I’ve seen his name written as Touch the Clouds, Raising Clouds, Touch the Cloud, and various other names that essentially pair great heights and clouds. I think its a really gorgeous name.

Information on Touch the Clouds is a bit spotty; there is a period of time where he may or may not have been in a battle, and judging by what I’ve read about his history, that timeline can cause great strife amongst historians/ fans of Touch The Clouds, so I thought that I (being a lover of history, but by no means a historian), would skip that debate altogether and instead give you a few breadcrumbs to follow on your own.

Ordinarily, I loathe when people site wikipedia as the ultimate source for their information, but given the little bit you can easily find about Touch The Clouds online, I think the wiki page has done a pretty decent job of briefly summarizing the readily available information on his life—

Here is the introduction thru the section about his rise in prominence, and below you will find the link to read the entire page:

Touch the Clouds (Lakota: Maȟpíya Ičáȟtagya or Maȟpíya Íyapat’o) (c. 1838 – September 5, 1905) was a chief of the Minneconjou Teton Lakota (also known as Sioux) known for his bravery and skill in battle, physical strength and for his diplomacy in counsel. The youngest son of Lone Horn, he was brother to Spotted Elk, Frog, and Roman Nose. There is evidence suggesting that he was a cousin to Crazy Horse.

When Touch the Clouds’s Wakpokinyan band split in the mid 1870s, the band traveled to the Cheyenne River Agency. He assumed the leadership of the band in 1875 after the death of his father, and retained leadership during the initial period of the Great Sioux War of 1876-77. After the Battle of the Little Bighorn, he took the band north, eventually surrendering at the Spotted Tail Agency, where he enlisted in the Indian Scouts. However, not long after being present at the death of Crazy Horse, Touch the Clouds transferred with his band back to the Cheyenne River Agency.

Touch the Clouds became one of the new leaders of the Minneconjou at the Cheyenne River Agency in 1881, keeping his position until his death on September 5, 1905. Upon his death his son, Amos Charging First, took over as the new chief.

Born between 1837 and 1839, Touch the Clouds was the youngest son of the influential headman Lone Horn, leader of a Minneconjou band called the Wakpokinyan (Flies Along the Stream). Touch the Clouds was known for his height and great strength, to which his name relates. Lieutenant Henry R. Lemly, who met Touch the Clouds in 1877, described him as a Minneconjou “of magnificent physique, standing six feet five inches in his moccasins, and without an ounce of surplus flesh, weighing 280 pounds”.

By the time that Touch the Clouds had reached his thirties, he had earned the respect of his peers and had been selected as the head of one of the tribe’s warrior societies In this role, he often led war parties against enemy tribes. White Bull later recalled an occasion in 1872 when Touch the Clouds led a horse-raiding party but decided to turn back upon discovering that they were greatly outnumbered by the Crow.

The crisis over the increasing European-American presence on the northern Great Plains caused growing dissension among the various Lakota bands as they debated what to do. The Wakpokinyan appear to have split, with part of the band (including Touch the Clouds) going in to the Cheyenne River Agency on the Missouri River. A portion led by Lame Deer chose to remain out. Lone Horn struggled to maintain dialogue between the various factions of Minneconjou and their relatives, part of his long record as a Lakota diplomat.After Lone Horn died in 1875, the mantle of leadership fell to his son,just as the US Army was beginning its campaign against the non-treaty Cheyenne and Lakota bands.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Touch_the_Clouds

Here is another link with quotes, family history and a bit more information about Touch The Clouds. The pictures posted above are from this source:

http://www.american-tribes.com/Lakota/BIO/TouchClouds.htm

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